Monday, September 12, 2011

Vintage Quilts

One of our employees and his wife have had to move their mom into an assisted living. They let me know there were quilts in the house.
The colors on this one are BRIGHT yellow- dandelion yellow- although the photo doesn't show it.  What you can't see is one end pretty much in tatters. The wife said her grandmother made it for her and it was on her bed growing up. Because the star doesn't go all the way to the border I told her I could easily fix it if it had sentimental value. Nope, none. These quilts will end up in an estate sale and the new owners will never know who made them.
Here is quilt number 2.
It has a wide age and variety of fabrics.  The wine color of about 1900 is one of my favorites.
Most of this quilt has fabric from the 1930's.
It has a fun pieced back.

And it even has a bit of humble patchwork to it.


I had two more quilts to look at, one a Lone Star in silk that was disintegrating and another top and back that had been taken apart to replace the batting.

I went to her house today because she told me she had found more quilts. One was 2 sided and a little older than these, but lumpy and tied.
I don't have room for every single orphan quilt so I'm hoping they will find a home better then a garage rag.






29 comments:

  1. What a shame that these quilts have "no sentimental value." So glad that you were able to rescue some of them.

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  2. So sad! Hope these quilts made with love go to good homes.

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  3. It amazes me that some folks don't love and value quilts... so sad... hope the quilts will find good homes with those who will treasure them.

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  4. I guess that is why it is so important to put a label on each quilt~ I need to play catch up and do that on all mine!

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  5. That makes me sad - how can it NOT have sentimental value? Cathy is right about labels and I am the world's worst at labeling my quilts.

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  6. I hope those quilts end up in a good home too...I am afraid for my own quilts...I think the best solution is for me to find homes with people who love them now!

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  7. wow. That is crazy. I stopped along the highway just last week and picked up a quilt that was laying on the side of the road. I did not check it until I got home, but it was a wreck...literally. Don't think it can be fixed at all. But...could not stand to see it laying there like that. Looked on craigslist in the lost and found but no one was looking for it. :o(

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  8. It just breaks my heart to see obvious family heirlooms sold like this! It's so hard to believe that no one in the family has no interest in preserving a quilt that has so much family history tied up in it! Heartbreaking! I hope they will all find good homes with new owners that will appreciate them.

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  9. Good reminder to label your quilts and keep a journal or something to describe the quilts, the fabric, why you made that quilt. The stories make the quilts even more spacial.
    Of course you can't rescue all the homeless quilts, but lots of people appreciate quilts so hopefully they will all find good homes.

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  10. Like everyone else, it makes me sad that these quilts aren't treasured and loved. I have orphan quilt blocks that a g,g grandmother, who I didn't even know, made and I can't even bear to part with them...lol

    Hopefully my girls will distribute my quilts when I'm gone. Right now they fight over who gets what... :)

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  11. I was that way when I was younger and now I regret it. Even if the quilts are no good, they would look nice on a chest in a guest room or used in doll projects that she could cherish.

    Debbie

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  12. Like everyone else I hope these quilts find a good home. Is there a quilt guild in your area? I'm sure someone there would take these orphans in.

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  13. I bought that same bright yellow star quilt at an antique mall in Amarillo TX a few weeks ago. Mine is in almost perfect condition and it is quilted in RED thread.
    It's almost sad to buy them even tho I love them, but where did it come from? What is it's story? Sad, but I'm glad I can make a new home for it.

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  14. I hope my grandchildren never feel that way! What a treasure to let go.
    I just barely started labeling quilts again--got away from it for a long time! I love Bonnie's quick "fold a square into a triangle and sew on two sides as you attach binding" method (there's got to be a shorter way to identify that).

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  15. I want my all quilts to be heirlooms, and have put a Stashbuster label in the corners with my name, the pattern and date on them. They are all sentimental to me! Lots of time and the family doesn't appreciate them? So sad. Thanks for the rescue

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  16. Oh, I do so hope these quilts finding a loving home - they deserve it!

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  17. Your post today gave us all a lot to think about................

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  18. I taped a sewing show this weekend and it was on making a tote, using up a vintage quilt would be a great idea if there was enough of it in good enough shape. I've rescued 2 from an old guy i Pendleton, paid $100 each, the one I loved still has the pencil marks on it.

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  19. Hopefully they will.
    I also hope that the joy was in making them, not what became of them.
    I like the star and the other one is fun to study those old fabrics

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  20. How can a beautiful quilt like that not have sentimental value??? I'm glad you shared them with us - thanks!

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  21. I always enjoy seeing the vintage quilts so thank you for sharing. This isn't the first time you've mentioned the wine color so "ah ha" I think I'm learning something here. ;) I often think what will happen to my quilts especially since I don't have children but I worry more about when I can't make 'em anymore to be honest!!!

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  22. Are they looking for a home for those quilts?? I could help out!

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  23. Oh I love that star quilt and love that it was so loved and used.

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  24. The Lone Star is a beauty in whatever condition it is in.

    I suppose everyone has their different perspectives. Different things they value. That's just how the world is. There will always be quilters and non-quilters!

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  25. It's strange to me that some people don't feel any attachments to old family things..they are so precious to me. Whenever I see really old photos in antique malls I just shake my head that someone gave them up. Didn't ANYONE in the family want them???

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  26. I suppose it's understandable that nonquilters would not feel the strong attachment and appreciation for quilts, as we do. We are a strongly passionate group by nature.
    But it's downright sad when there's no attachment when the quilt maker was a relative. That's just sad.

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  27. At least the quilts must have been well used to keep them warm so they served their purpose I suppose. It just goes to show that the makers of quilts aren't the ones to decide if they are to be heirlooms or even passed on. Ditto on quilt labeling.

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  28. A tattered quilt hopefully means one that was loved and appreciated even if that is no longer the case! Hope they find a way to someone elses heart!

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  29. What wonderful quilts! Sad, really when you think of how much work has gone into them and how much warmth/comfort they provided over the years! I hope they find appreciative homes!!!

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