Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Medallion Sewalong Part 2

The first pieced border of our medallion was chosen by Randy and is the pinwheel block. This block will finish at 3". I tried a new way to make my pinwheels that I saw it on Missouri Quilt Co Video.
Cut two (2) 3 1/2" squares, one light, one dark for your pinwheels. Sew 1/4' around all the sides. Yep, trust me on this one!
Now, cut twice on the diagonal. Gently press the seams towards the darker fabric.
I always trim the dog ears. Lay out your pinwheel block.
Sew two halves together...
Press toward the darker fabric again.
But your center seams and sew.
You will need to trim your block to 3 1/2" I line up the center both ways at 1 3/4"(which is half of 3.5) Trim, turn and trim again... Tada!!  Now make 19 more for a total of 20!

If you've got your center made be sure to linkup! It is always so much fun to see the blocks in one place.

I'm going to Quilt market in Portland this week!  Am picking up 2 special friends from the airport tomorrow afternoon. I'm sure we will post a photo or two!  I'm so excited!

17 comments:

  1. I've seen this method, but never tried it. No problem with the bias edges stretching?
    Who is the vendor that is getting you into market, or am I misunderstanding which "market" you are attending?

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    Replies
    1. Easy does it with the iron and the hst will be fine.

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  2. I see Janet O has beat me to my question. :0) I was wondering about the bias edges too. Have a great time at market with friends!!

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  3. I could hardly wait to try this new method and it is simple and quick. However, those bias outside edges make me nervous and I think I'll stay with my Easy Angle method. I'm glad I tried your new method though and I'll keep the idea on my back burner.

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    Replies
    1. Personally I thought it was super fast! It's fun to try something new every now and then.

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  4. Very slick!!!! Thanks for the tip.

    :) Carolyn

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  5. I've made pinwheel blocks this way and didn't find the bias outside edges to be difficult, but the blocks I made were rather small. Have a great time at market!

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  6. It makes no sense to me to create 8 bias edges when one can sew squares into hst with no bias edges..... what am I missing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 101 ways to get the same end result. I thought it would be fun to try a new way.
      Bias edges? No big deal!

      Delete
  7. Lori,
    I love your instructions. very complete.
    Hope you have a great time at Market...HEHEHE... I'm sure your friends will be great to be with!!
    ME ME ME!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I've never tried that method, but I think I saw the video once. Maybe I'll try it sometime. We are leaving today on our trip. Too bad I won't get there in time for the market!

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  9. I am missing market this time. :( You all have fun. Is Sven going too?
    I have seen that method and I am going to try it. Looks fast.

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  10. I saw that you were already in Portland. Wish I was there too. This HST method was shown at our guild a while back. I like how you say "GENTLY" with all those bias edges on the outside of the block. Living through you guys on this sew-a-long.

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  11. Hi Lori, I too am wondering about the bias edges around the entire block. Not about ironing and sewing together but about the finished quilt. How does it hold up through use and washing? Will it tend to go out of shape? Get bulgey in the middle? Get wonky? I'm hoping the answer is that it won't. This method seems relatively new as quilters have been taught for years, decades really, to avoid bias edges so not sure anyone has had a quilt made this way long enough to know the answer to my question. Maybe having a border around the quilt will eliminate any issues with stretching? Thank you in advance for your reply. Camille

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  12. Hi Camille, your profile is private so I hoe you see this. All triangles have at least one bias edge. As far as I can tell by examining antique quilts they hold up just fine after use and washing for many years. Personally I have so many quilts they do not need to last for decades. I'll never fret over a few bias edges.

    ReplyDelete

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