Monday, September 10, 2012

Frixion Pens Part 2

Before you read this post, please jump on over to Susi's blog and see her lovely A Little Porch Time for August. She didn't get a chance to post her link a few days ago. Thanks!

If you missed Part 1 you may want to go back and read the first experiment with the Frixion pens.
I left off showing you the red/white strip after ironing.

Here's that same strip after putting in the freezer. Yes, the lines came back. (I'm not concerned about my quilts freezing, but some people were)


Here's the same strip after throwing it in the wash then putting it back in the freezer.
New piece. Freshly marked with the Frixion pen.
This time I used a hair dryer on it instead of the iron. I don't think I'd want to do that to a whole quilt, but you could put it in a sunny window and it would do the same thing.  The marks disappeared but I can still see the white marks where my pen wrote on the red fabric.
Washed one more time. Not even white marks on the red.


Washed, then froze. No marks.

My lesson is the frixion pens should be washed out once you iron it.
Thanks for humoring me on my un-scientific science experiment.

 The bottom line is always check your pen/pencil/chalk before marking your quilt!!

26 comments:

  1. I just wanted to let you know I had trouble with the Frixion pens on black fabric...I panicked because when I ironed the marking turned white as on your red fabric. But Shout cloths to the rescue!! They took the white marks out and they never came back. (I used a piece of muslin underneath and the pink Frixion color bled on that)

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  2. Thank you, Lori, for sharing this very useful information.

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  3. Thanks for doing all that research.

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  4. How nice to have all the research done for us!!!! Thank you.

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  5. Thanks for the experiment, Lori. It looks like those pens are quite good for marking. Even when the lines are faint, I think the quilting would hide them. Also, Im not concerned about my quilts freezing either, so I think I would go ahead and use these pens. I've not had much luck with other markers.

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  6. Hi Lori...i'm using Frixion pens to draw on satin. I of course tested this before i dove into the actual quilt! I do see a faint line after ironing but it is covered with the quilting. I posted here: http://chezstitches.blogspot.com/2012/09/satin-fabric-and-poly-thread.html some feathers i stitched onto pink satin after marking. no issues. :) Once i get more of the actual quilt quilted, i'll post more about the pens and link back to you. thanks for doing this research project!! ~karen

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  7. Thanks for the market research, Lori! We'll have to start paying you as our quilt community consumer reporter. : )

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  8. I am so glad you did this "research" as I have the pens in possession and scared to death to use them. Now I know exactly how to mark and iron off and then wash. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Just remember to test on the fabric YOU will be marking on.

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  9. Yes - always test fabrics. I'm glad washing it afterwards took care of the problem. I will have to try washing the dark fabrics after marking - I've used them on lights because the lines usually disappeared but always left a white mark on the dark fabrics.

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  10. Great info. Thanks for taking the time to experiment and share.

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  11. WOW!! I love your experiment! BRAVO!! You could go into business now, testing things!! VBG

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  12. I like the way you did this. Back when I was in college (in the olden days) I took a course in textile chemistry and this is pretty much how we did our experiments - try everything you can think of. Of course, the professor had also given us a list of things we had to do but they were along the same lines as try everything you can think of. I also like that you got the same results I did when I tried these pens out. It makes me feel more confident about using them.

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  13. Way to put it thru the paces Lori, good experiment. I wish quilt marking could be easier :)

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  14. i went out & purchased these pens after reading your post i usually just use Pigma Pens for marking my quilt tops for any stitchery needed....did test for the erasability on tea-dyed fabric and it still ironed away, now up till this point i haven't ever frozen one of quilts but will remember to wash first should i chose to do so....

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  15. Thank u...I have these pens but never have used them. My concern was for the quilt in the belly of the airplane when it goes to Europe to visit my daughter. Although most airplanes do have a compartment that is pressurized for animals, all do not have for luggage. That temp will be very cold.

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  16. I enjoyed your un-scientific science experiment :0) I have more confidence in them after seeing your results.

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  17. I find the interesting thing is that who in the world would ever put a quilt in weather as cold as a freezer? I have been using these pens for quite awhile now. I must say they are much better than any "blue" marking pen. I would recommend them to anyone. I have the whole set of them. I just wished they made a "white" marker for the darker fabrics. The last 3 Clover white marking pens haven't worked and they are really expensive. I wish everyone the best in using these pens. I personally think they are the best.

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  18. thanks for doing the work and then letting us know.
    I am not worried about my fabric freezing either. LOL
    Good advise to test any marking tool to make sure it doesn't have unexpected side effects.

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  19. A fun experiment and now a great new tool to add to the arsenal *s*

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  20. I just bought some of these when I was in SC this weekend....My wonder was the same thing -- if washed marks would come back, or how many times it would take to wash them out completely. I do wash my quilts, more than I freeze them -- so this is good!

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  21. Great followup on the pens!! Good to know that washing seems to resolve the lingering lines. Marking is always such a challenge to find something that you can see, stays on long enough, but then disappears when you're done.

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  22. For those who think you won't freeze a quilt, I didn't either. But over Christmas is was in the trunk and it was freezing outside! Thanks for the tips on how to get it out for good :)

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  23. I never thought I'd freeze a quilt either but it was in my trunk over Christmas in freezing weather! Thanks for the research and tips to get it out!

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  24. Well, I tested black and blue frixion pens on most of my quilt-show-bought hand dyed fabrics that I used in a new art quilt. No evidence of problem. I failed to test the red pen, which I then foolishly turned around and used; and I failed to test the brown fabric, which together, created a real nightmare on my finished quilt.

    I found Milk does remove the pen, however,it also messes with the dye in these hand dyed fabrics…a tragedy for a finished quilt! SO future readers, keep milk in your idea toolbox for using with this pen! This works fine for most fabrics.

    For this project, after spending days testing possibilities, I found soaking the marked areas with rubbing alcohol, leave for a few minutes, then apply more rubbing alcohol and scrub with a toothbrush then heat with an iron. It worked for me…as far as I know. -Some of the lines began to reappear in a hot room so I retreated with more rubbing alcohol and so far, the Marker from Hell has not reappeared with both cold and hot testing.

    Time has not yet tested the reappearance of those damn lines, but I have hopes problem solved!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Well, I tested black and blue frixion pens on most of my quilt-show-bought hand dyed fabrics that I used in a new art quilt. No evidence of problem. I failed to test the red pen, which I then foolishly turned around and used; and I failed to test the brown fabric, which together, created a real nightmare on my finished quilt.

    I found Milk does remove the pen, however,it also messes with the dye in these hand dyed fabrics…a tragedy for a finished quilt! SO future readers, keep milk in your idea toolbox for using with this pen! This works fine for most fabrics.

    For this project, after spending days testing possibilities, I found soaking the marked areas with rubbing alcohol, leave for a few minutes, then apply more rubbing alcohol and scrub with a toothbrush then heat with an iron. It worked for me…as far as I know. -Some of the lines began to reappear in a hot room so I retreated with more rubbing alcohol and so far, the Marker from Hell has not reappeared with both cold and hot testing.

    Time has not yet tested the reappearance of those damn lines, but I have hopes problem solved!

    ReplyDelete

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