Monday, March 25, 2019

Quilt & Fiber Art Museum

Here is the historic building in LaConner, WA that houses the Pacific Northwest Quilt and Fiber Museum. Isn't it lovely?!

The quilts that greeted us are in the museum collection. The volunteer said they were put up to bring a bit of spring to the PNW. It has been so snowy, cold and wet. Perfect way to welcome spring.










 I'm pretty sure several fabric in this 1840's quilt have been reproduced. 

The Hartsford Quilts weren't quite what I was expecting, but still fascinating and a terrific story. 
“The Hartsfield’s collection’s roots date back to the early 1850’s with my great, great, great grandmother who lived in Whitlock, Tennessee, and whose name was Ms. Molly. She was the seamstress for the plantation’s master and she was his property. As a slave, she was “beholden” to her slave master’s wishes, and she bore two children by her owner. Ms. Molly had two children out of slavery; the name of one son is Richard Caldwell, who is my great grandfather [x4], the other son’s name is unknown.”
                                                 Jim Tharpe

 I'm still a little confused if photos were allowed or not, so I am only sharing the 3 quilts that a pattern has been reproduced and can be purchased by contacting the museum.
Make sure to read the story below. This one was behind glass so was harder to photograph. The one made from the pattern looked like a really good copy.


What I love about these quilts is that the quiltmakers had to make do! Love those 3 green background blocks.


We had a feeling these were from pajamas. How sweet!


I LOVE the half blocks all the way around this quilt! I'm not sure the pattern has them or not.

I love that the quilt owners feel a deep responsibility to keep and document these family quilts- no matter how humble they are. 



23 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing these lovely quilts. The close up of the one that you thought were pajamas is a cowboy feedsack print. I have it in 3 different colorways. I'm sure the did make PJ's out of feedsacks!

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  2. An amazing collection of family quilts, how nice that they weren't given out individually to various family members who might not have valued them as highly. Thanks for sharing!

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  3. What an amazing house! Oh if those walls could talk, what stories they would tell! And I love looking at the fabrics in old quilts as much as the patterns and designs. The last quilt though, I love everything about it. How I wish I had been able to hear the stories of the person(s) who stitched on it. Thanks for sharing.

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  4. Love the house and the quilts are lovely. The hand quilting magnificent!

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  5. Thanks for this Lori! The story of the quilt collection is fascinating. The quilts at the top of the post are fabulous!! I love the triple line quilting inside the feathered wreaths - gorgeous!

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  6. Fun post! I am amazed at how bright the cheddar is! I always thought older fabrics were more muted colors.

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  7. Thanks for sharing! How great that you were able to see them up close.

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  8. The quilting in the first quilt is stunning. We just don't do it like that anymore. Thanks for the tour.

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  9. Ditto everything everyone else has already said! I'd like to add what a great feeling you have for what to share, ie the detail pictures: the magnificent hand quilting on the first one. The fabrics! Oh,my. And the stories, via the labels. Thank you for taking the time.

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  10. I really enjoyed this post, Lori. Thank you for sharing all these precious quilts with us. Thank you for the close-up pictures too. Not everyone thinks of taking close-up pictures. I appreciate it. ;^)

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  11. Thank for sharing these quilts! Beautiful quilting on the applique quilts. Amazing that the other quilts were kept in the family and not lost, as so many are, or the information about them.

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  12. I used to want to live in a house like that. The maintenance would be overwhelming.

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  13. What an amazing collection! They are beautiful. I agree, I too tend to like the make do aspects of old quilts.

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  14. I thoroughly enjoyed this--and thanks for including the story behind the Harstfield collection. I am glad you were confused enough about the photo issue that you were still able to share a few with us. :)

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  15. I am doing my happy dance. I will be on Bainbridge for a few weeks of Nana duty. I am feeling a roadtrip! I came to quiltmaking through a love of history and the day to day lives of those before us. I am lucky to have the keys to a local museums textile room but I am always delighted to see more.

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  16. Thanks for sharing these wonderful examples of the quilt maker’s art! I wish I live close enough to see this exhibit.

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  17. It makes me want to make sure all my older quilts (made by my mother and MIL) have labels on them. Shame on me for not doing it sooner. I would love to go to that museum!

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  18. Thankyou for sharing these delightful old quilts. I agree completely when you say "I love that the quilt owners feel a deep responsibility to keep and document these family quilts- no matter how humble they are". I have seen so many quilts at the American museum here in Somerset, where there is no information known and their history can only be guessed at.

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  19. Thank you for the lovely Show. I especially loved the story of the Hartsfield Family and how the generations cared for the quilts. I dont know if that would happen now days, as the young people
    down here wouldn't have the same affinity for them.

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  20. Those are some GREAT quilts, Lori! What a great experience!

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  21. Oh, what a beautiful building to showcase these lovely quilts!

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  22. beautiful building and wonderful quilts - wow! Love all the quilting textures and I spy one of my favorite repros with the eagle.

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